Monday, December 15, 2008

John Currin

The Veil

John Currin is an artist well-known for his painting dealing with provocative sexual and social themes.

"John Currin’s paintings emphasize a postmodern approach to the culturally relative nature of beauty and gender. His paintings of large-breasted women are somewhat antagonistic and sarcastic. At first glance, he seems to be offering male viewers what they want, yet at the same time, his exaggerated women parody contemporary Western culture, where women are encouraged to develop impossible standards of beauty."

(writes David Morris)

The Wizard

"...if it was Manet who demonstrated the nakedness of the nude, it is Currin who exhibits its psychopathology, the weirdness of doing in art what you can't always do in reality. No painting points up the discrepancy better than The Wizard (1994), in which a man wearing dark gloves lays his hands on a woman's ample breasts. Both figures close their eyes, as though to acknowledge something already dreamlike about the encounter. Why, though, is this man a wizard? Did he use magic to mesmerize the woman? To strip her naked? To enlarge her breasts? Even if he did, what does he gain? As a visualist, Currin was no doubt concerned with the contrast the black gloves formed against the white breasts, and yet these hand-coverings condemn the wizard to touch without feeling. The wizard is both more and less than a man: more, because he's able to bring his fantasy to life; less, because without sight and touch he's weirdly incapable of enjoying it. And in that sense, the painting could serve as an allegory of the nude as such, since the same holds true of the artist: in the nude, he can realize but not enjoy any fantasy."

(writes Supervert)

Sunday, December 14, 2008

Yves Klein: Untitled Anthropometry

Untitled Anthropometry
by Yves Klein

Yves Klein redefined the notion of painting and nude with his innvotive technique of 'living brushes'. He would paint the body of female models in blue paint, and pressed them or dragged them across the paper and canvas to come up with his paintings. In the painting above, repeated blurred images of a female nude seem to emerge from the canvas. The naked body is the 'brush' as well as the object of this great piece of art.

Kim Dingle

Never in School (flip over)
by Kim Dingle

"...Kim Dingle has been exploring the subversive edges of female childhood and myths of nationhood and history in lush paintings and startling sculptures for over two decades. Her characters "Fatty" and "Fudge"-- known as "Priss Girls" when in sculptural form--act out, misbehave, and are gripped by a mindless and inexplicable violence against nature and each other. Dingle, who often paints in a palette of blurry beiges, sepias, and browns on vellum, creates ethereal scenes of frolic and frenzy that reference historical events and cultural norms..."
(Extracted from Brooklyn Museum page on Kim Dingle. Copyright Brooklyn Museum)

Friday, December 12, 2008

Deathly Seduction

Click to enlarge

Deathly Seduction
by Richard Young
Image used with artist's permission

Thursday, December 11, 2008

Woman in Black Hat

Woman in Black Hat
by Kees van Dongen

Insect Woman

by Edland Man

The Floating Fabric

Model: Sarah Robertson
Photographer: James Hicky
Source of the Photograph: Naked Philosophy

Wednesday, December 10, 2008

Antoine de Villiers

Female Drawing

Here By My Side


by Antoine de Villiers
Images used with the artist's permission

Thursday, December 4, 2008

Mark Spain


by Mark Spain

Alfred Gockel

Endless Love

Romance in Red II

Nude in Repose

by Alfred Gockel

Wednesday, December 3, 2008

Edvard Munch: The Kiss

The Kiss
by Edvard Munch

Invega Skin

Lindsay Hopkinson (Photographer)
Taylor James (CGI Effects)